Current Exhibitions

What's currently on view at MMoCA

Don Baum, The Apparition, 1988. Canvas board and wood, 19½ x 14 x 18 inches. Collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Purchase, through National Endowment for the Arts grant with a matching gift from the Rudolph and Louise Langer Fund.

A Tumultuous Assembly: Collage, Assemblage, and the Found Object

A Tumultuous Assembly explores the artistic legacy of collage, assemblage, and use of the found object. Initiated by Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, and Marcel Duchamp in 1912–13, these radical approaches to artmaking revolutionized the nature and history of modern art. By mobilizing commonplace materials, collage-based techniques elevated the objects and detritus from everyday existence into the realm of fine art.

Frida Kahlo, Still Life: Pitahayas, 1938. Oil on aluminum, 10 x 14 inches / 17 x 20¾ inches (frame). Collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Bequest of Rudolph and Louise Langer. © 2013 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Los Grandes del Arte Moderno Mexicano

Los Grandes del Arte Moderno Mexicano(Masters of Mexican Modern Art) showcases the artists who, more than any others, defined Mexican Modernism in the 1920s and 1930s: Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Frida Kahlo, Leopoldo Méndez, José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo.

James Van Der Zee, Wedding Day, Harlem, 1924. Gelatin silver print, 9½ x 7 inches. Collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Museum Purchase Fund. © Donna Van Der Zee.

Turn Turn Turn

Turn Turn Turn is an anthology of life’s joys and sorrows as visualized in modern and contemporary art. Inspired by the lyrical language of Ecclesiastes 3, which meditates on the circular nature of time as reflected in the seasons, the exhibition addresses the ongoing cycle of changing circumstances in the course of human events. Its title is taken from Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There is a Season), a song Pete Seeger wrote in the late 1950s and whose lyrics came from the third chapter of Ecclesiastes in the King James Version (1611) of the Bible.