Past Exhibitions

A complete list of exhibitions from 1979-2011 is available here

October 24, 2009 to May 9, 2010

Cage and Cunningham: Chance, Time, and Concept in the Visual Arts

Cage and Cunningham: Chance, Time, and Concept in the Visual Arts pays homage to the visual legacy inspired by the life and work of composer, poet, and artist John Cage (1912-1992) and dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham (1919-2009). The exhibition pays tribute to Cage and Cunningham’s fifty-year collaboration through works from the permanent collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, as well as seminal works from collections in the region. The exhibition will be on view in MMoCA ’s State Street Gallery from October 24, 2009, through May 9, 2010.

September 13, 2009 to January 3, 2010

Signs of the Times: Robert Rauschenberg’s America

Robert Rauschenberg (1925–2008), who came to the fore in the 1950s, was one of the great artists of our age. He was also a prominent chronicler of American culture in the second half of the twentieth century, as evidenced in a new exhibition at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art.

July 25, 2009 to August 15, 2010

From Nature: Realist Works in MMoCA’s Permanent Collection

From Nature: Realist Works in MMoCA’s Permanent Collection is the last in a three-part series of exhibitions that examines the major styles of modernism. The exhibition is curated by the museum’s curator of collections, Rick Axsom.

June 6, 2009 to October 8, 2009

Curators' Choice: New Works from MMoCA's Collection

Curators’ Choice: New Works from MMoCA’s Collection presents selected works that have entered the permanent collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in the last three years. The exhibition, on view in the museum’s State Street Gallery through October 8, 2009, features drawings, paintings, prints, sculpture, and mixed-media works by sixteen artists. The works were selected for the exhibition by MMoCA curator of collections Rick Axsom, director Stephen Fleischman, and curator of exhibitions Jane Simon.

May 2, 2009 to August 23, 2009

Return to Function

Return to Function brings together contemporary artists who make functional objects based on theoretical principles. Featuring a dune buggy, a camper, a soccer ball with right angles, a cellular telephone that doubles as an exercise device, and a mobile studio—as well as garments and a do-it-yourself coffin, among other works—Return to Function examines the role of objects in our lives as perceived by 21 contemporary artists who employ the expansive nature of art to illuminate unexplored aspects of the familiar.

March 15, 2009 to May 17, 2009

Young at Art 2009

Young at Art, presents works of art by Madison Metropolitan School District students in kindergarten through grade 12. Organized biennially, the exhibition is the result of a long-standing collaboration between MMoCA and the school district’s Fine Arts Department.

An opening reception will take place on Sunday, March 15, from 3–4:30 pm. Teachers, student artists, and families are invited to celebrate the works on view in the exhibition. A marimba band composed of students from Chavez Elementary School will perform in the museum’s lobby from 3–4 pm.

January 24, 2009 to April 11, 2009

Something Wicked This Way Comes

A major new exhibition of works from the permanent collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art explores the various ways that artists have represented evil in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Something Wicked This Way Comes is on view in the museum’s main galleries from January 24 to April 11, 2009. The exhibition features 96 paintings, prints, photographs, mixed-media works, and sculptures by 65 artists, and was organized by the museum’s curator of collections, Rick Axsom.

December 6, 2008 to March 8, 2009

Barbara Probst: Exposures

Barbara Probst: Exposures will be on view in the State Street Gallery of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art from December 6, 2008, to March 8, 2009. The exhibition is comprised of groupings of two to six large-format photographs from the Exposures series, which the artist began in 2000 and continues to expand.  By showing a single action in photographs taken simultaneously from different points of view, Probst illustrates the myriad ways in which a moment can be depicted, and by extension, experienced.

August 13, 2008 to December 28, 2008

George Segal: Street Scenes

The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (MMoCA) presents an exhibition of sculpture by the late American artist George Segal from in the museum’s main galleries. The exhibition, organized by MMoCA director Stephen Fleischman and curator of exhibitions Jane Simon, features sixteen sculptural works from the 1960s to the late 1990s focusing on the urban environment.

August 2, 2008 to November 16, 2008

Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt: The Absent City

Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt: The Absent City examines scale, transparency, and language while drawing attention to the function of the museum and its relationship to the community.

July 19, 2008 to July 19, 2009

An Art of Inner Necessity: Expressionist Works from MMoCA's Permanent Collection

An Art of Inner Necessity examines the expressionist tradition in modern and contemporary art through paintings, sculpture, and works on paper from the permanent collection of the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. It is the second in a series of exhibitions that focus on the three major styles of twentieth-century modernism in the visual arts: abstraction, expressionism, and realism.

May 24, 2008 to July 20, 2008

Girls and Company: Feminist Works from MMoCA’s Permanent Collection

Girls and Company examines the legacy of feminism in art through paintings, photographs, and prints from the 1960s, 70s, 80s, and 90s. Through thoughtful and ground-breaking works, the exhibition examines female bodies, icons, and language, as well as the underlying system of sexism that has affected so many artists. Girls and Company uncovers issues that continue to confront artists, while also posing the question: what does it mean to be a feminist artist today?

May 17, 2008 to August 17, 2008

TL Solien: Myths & Monsters

The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (MMoCA) presents a survey of the work of Madison-based artist TL Solien from May 17 to August 17, 2008, in the museum’s main galleries. Featuring 43 paintings, prints, and unique works on paper, TL Solien: Myths & Monsters examines works from the beginning of the artist’s career in the 1980s to the present day, focusing on Solien’s repeated iconography and sustained personal exploration.

March 1, 2008 to May 18, 2008

Altered Geometry: Contemporary Sculpture from MMoCA’s Collection

The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art presents an exhibition of sculpture from its permanent collection from March 1 through May 18, 2008. Altered Geometry: Contemporary Sculpture from MMoCA’s Collection investigates the use of geometric forms in contemporary sculpture. The exhibition is on view in MMoCA’s State Street Gallery.

February 2, 2008 to April 13, 2008

Jasper Johns: The Prints

The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art will present a retrospective exhibition of prints by Jasper Johns in the museum’s main galleries. Bill Goldston, director of Universal Limited Art Editions, which has published many of the prints on view in Jasper Johns: The Prints, will speak in the MMoCA lecture hall at 7 pm as part of the opening preview on February 1.

December 1, 2007 to December 17, 2008

Stephen Hilyard: The Beautiful Lie

Stephen Hilyard: The Beautiful Lie uses videos and photographic works to explore the power and reliability of the image in contemporary culture. Works in the exhibition include a recent series of compositions entitled King Wave in which Hilyard uses dramatic and doctored photographs to probe the truthfulness and iconic stature of the image. Compositions in this series show monstrous green waves coupled with diminutive images of curb architecture in Los Angeles cemeteries.

November 9, 2007 to July 13, 2008

Individual Experience: The Photographs of Ida Wyman

Madison newcomer Ida Wyman, whose career as a photojournalist began in the 1940s, is the subject of a one-person show at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Twenty-five of Wyman's black-and-white photographs are on display in the museum's Works-on-Paper Study Center.

A former resident of Bronx, New York, Wyman moved to Madison in 2006. Individual Experience: The Photographs of Ida Wyman, is her first one-person exhibition in a museum.

October 14, 2007 to January 8, 2008

Karl Wirsum: Winsome Works(some) and Hairy Who (and some others)

Karl Wirsum: Winsome Works(some) and Hairy Who (and some others) explore the work of Wirsum and his contemporaries in the charged Chicago art scene that emerged in the 1960s. The exhibitions comprise an important retrospective of Karl Wirsum's paintings and sculptures, as well as an overview of Chicago Imagism drawn from MMoCA's permanent collection and an important private collection.

September 8, 2007 to July 13, 2008

Making Visible the Invisible: Abstract Art from MMoCA’s Permanent Collection

The paintings, sculpture, and works on paper in the Henry Street Gallery explore the tradition of abstraction in the visual arts. Abstract art is an expression of pure form and color, analogous to music. It has carried a rich variety of meanings since its inception in the second decade of the twentieth century, and its history continues to the present. The exhibition will be on view through July 13, 2008.

August 11, 2007 to November 11, 2007

Tim Laun: Sunday, September 20th, 1992

On September 20, 1992, Green Bay Packers quarterback Don Majkowski was tackled to the ground and suffered a strained ligament in his ankle. Louisiana-born Brett Favre took over as quarterback. Initially, Favre’s novice colors showed through his green and yellow Packer uniform as he fumbled the ball and threw interceptions, but he soon took control. The Packers won the game, and Favre has started every game since.

August 4, 2007 to September 23, 2007

Jess: To and From the Printed Page

The artist Jess (1923-2004) emerged in the 1950s from within the literary context of Beat culture in San Francisco. The life partner of poet Robert Duncan, Jess collaborated extensively with poets and other writers, and worked with small presses and limited-edition publications throughout his career. Something of a cult artist, Jess is less widely known than some of his contemporaries, but his art is deeply revered by many.

Pages