Press Releases

Date of Release: 
Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Contact Info: 

Erika Monroe-Kane, Director of Communications
608.257.0158 x 237 or erika@mmoca.org

Spotlight Cinema Opens New Films to Madison

Spotlight Cinema Opens New Films to Madison

MMoCA Program Premieres Award-Winning Films in Madison

 

This fall, the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (MMoCA) will premiere a powerhouse slate of acclaimed films to Madison audiences.  MMoCA’s Spotlight Cinema will show eight critically-celebrated and award-winning narrative features and documentaries from around the world, screening every Wednesday night from September 28 through November 16. Highlights include the winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival (Dheepan), the winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival (Sand Storm), and new work by master directors Hirokazu Kore-eda (After the Storm) and Nikolaus Geyrhalter  (Homo Sapiens).

​"MMoCA's Spotlight Cinema series is Madison’s chance to experience eight of the year’s most acclaimed and vital arthouse films on the big screen. These eight films comprise a wide-ranging survey of contemporary world cinema, including top prize-winners from Cannes and Sundance, new work by revered master directors, and envelope-pushing visions from the auteurs of tomorrow," stated Mike King, Guest Film Curator.

Spotlight Cinema is curated by Mike King, and is a program of MMoCA’s education department. Funding for the series has been provided by maiahaus, Venture Investors, LLC, and an anonymous donor. Ticket sales begin at 6:30 pm in the Museum lobby; films screen at 7 pm in the lecture hall. Admission is free for MMoCA members and $7 per screening for the general public.

 

AT-A-GLANCE SCREENING SCHEDULE

September 28, 2016 • 7 pm

Dheepan (2015, France, 115 min., Digital)

Dir: Jacques Audiard

 

October 5, 2016 • 7 pm

Sand Storm (Sufat Chol) (2016, Israel, 87 min., Digital)

Dir: Elite Zexer

 

October 12, 2016 • 7 pm

Kaili Blues (Lu Bian Ye Can) (2015, China, 113 min., Digital)

Dir: Bi Gan

 

October 19, 2016 • 7 pm

Homo Sapiens (2016, Austria, 94 min., Digital)

Dir: Nikolaus Geyrhalter 

 

October 26, 2016 • 7 pm

Little Sister (2016, USA, 91 min., Digital)

Dir: Zach Clark 

 

November 2, 2016 • 7 pm

London Road (2015, UK, 91 min., Digital)

Dir: Rufus Norris 

 

November 9, 2016 • 7 pm

After the Storm (Umi yori mada fukaku)(2016, Japan, 117 min., Digital)

Dir: Hirokazu Kore-eda

 

November 16, 2016 • 7 pm

Don’t Call Me Son (Mae So Ha Uma)(2016, Brazil, 82 min., Digital)

Dir: Anna Muylaert

 

FILM DETAILS

September 28, 2016 • 7 pm

Dheepan (2015, France, 115 min., Digital)

Dir: Jacques Audiard

Cast: Antonythasan Jesuthasan, Kalieaswari Srinivasan, Claudine Vinasithamby

 

Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, Dheepan is the gripping new thriller from Jacques Audiard, director of the Oscar-nominated A Prophet and Rust and Bone.  Fleeing their country’s civil war, three Sri Lankan refugees are forced to pose as a family.  All but strangers to one another, the trio is relocated to a crime-infested Parisian housing project, where they struggle to build a new life together.  The setup for this timely and engrossing tale closely mirrors the biography of lead actor Jesuthasan Antonythasan, who came to France after growing up a child soldier in the Tamil Tigers, and here gives a riveting performance.  “Absolutely terrific… Audiard’s most  compassionate and humanistic film to date” (Indiewire).  In Tamil and French with English subtitles.

Stills: http://www.ifcfilms.com/films/dheepan

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFzLscT8_Dw

 

October 5, 2016 • 7 pm

Sand Storm (Sufat Chol) (2016, Israel, 87 min., Digital)

Dir: Elite Zexer

Cast: Lamis Ammar, Ruba Blal-Asfour, Haitham Omari, Khadija Alakel, Jalal Masrwa

 

Winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, Elite Zexer’s exceptional debut feature is perched at the border of tradition and modernity.  In a Bedouin village in southern Israel, a family is divided when the mother is put in the awkward spot of hosting her husband’s second wedding to a much younger wife.  She finds an outlet for her emotions when she discovers that her teenage daughter is in a secret relationship with a boy from her university.  “A lovely, deeply affecting film… one of the most admired at this year’s Sundance” (Bilge Ebiri, Vulture).  “Rich and moving… as rooted in the details and power dynamics of daily life as a Cassavetes film” (Amy Taubin, Film Comment).  In Arabic with English subtitles.

Stills: https://www.kinolorber.com/film/sandstorm

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gfzr3QAfI8s

 

October 12, 2016 • 7 pm

Kaili Blues (Lu Bian Ye Can) (2015, China, 113 min., Digital)

Dir: Bi Gan

Cast: Chen Yongzhong, Zhao Daqing, Luo Feiyang, Xie Lixun, Zeng Shuai

 

One of the year’s most celebrated art films is this transcendental wonder from 26 year-old poet Bi Gan, a first-time filmmaker from rural China. Searching for his brother’s long-lost child, a doctor journeys to a mysterious town where people’s lives overlap, and past, present, and future converge.  This beguiling, spectral odyssey introduces an exciting new voice in world cinema.  “A tour de force. The most memorable new movie that I’ve seen in quite some time…. manages to evoke Resnais, Tarkovsky, and Hou Hsiao-hsien” (J. Hoberman, New York Review of Books).  “Dazzling originality. It’s hard to emerge from this waking dream of a film without feeling the shock of the new” (Andrew Chan, Film Comment).  In Mandarin with English subtitles.

Stills: http://grasshopperfilm.com/film/kaili-blues/

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/160619140

 

October 19, 2016 • 7 pm

Homo Sapiens (2016, Austria, 94 min., Digital)

Dir: Nikolaus Geyrhalter 

 

A staggering documentary vision of the distant future, Homo Sapiens gives us an all-to-real glimpse of the world after mankind.  Travelling across the globe to sites like Fukushima and beyond, Nikolaus Geyrhalter (Our Daily Bread) photographs modern-day ruins: everyday man-made spaces that have been reclaimed by nature, as though hastily abandoned during some unnamed apocalypse.  Vegetation sprouts in decaying shopping malls; rivers course through shattered churches; birds nest in abandoned factories.  The only thing missing from these ghostly tableaux is us, present only in the detritus we leave behind.  Are office buildings, roller coasters, and parking lots destined to become our fossils?  Behold the first post-human documentary, eerily breathtaking and vast to contemplate.

Stills: http://www.kimstim.com/homo.html

 

October 26, 2016 • 7 pm

Little Sister (2016, USA, 91 min., Digital)

Dir: Zach Clark 

Cast: Addison Timlin, Ally Sheedy, Keith Poulson

 

October, 2008.  Obama is getting in, Halloween is around the corner, and a young novitiate is returning to her childhood home to come to grips with her eccentric family.  Confronted with her hippie burnout mother (a terrific Ally Sheedy) and a brother who was disfigured in the Iraq War, Colleen reverts to the goth persona of her youth.  Donning her old black lipstick and studded necklace, she cranks up the metal and sets to work repairing her family.  Zach Clark’s very funny seasonal comedy takes the pulse of America, and sides firmly with our country’s misfits. “The best new movie I’ve seen this year.  Equal parts heartfelt and volatile” (Calum Marsh, Village Voice).  “One of the great recent political films… nothing less than an up-to-date vision of the new, weird America.  Clark boldly reclaims American Christianity for the left, depicting a demanding faith of radical humanism, without pious displays or moralistic dogma, in service to love” (Richard Brody, The New Yorker).

Stills: http://www.littlesisterthemovie.com/images/

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/180833383

 

November 2, 2016 • 7 pm

London Road (2015, UK, 91 min., Digital)

Dir: Rufus Norris 

Cast: Olivia Colman, Paul Thornley, Nick Holder, Clare Burt, Michael Shaeffer, Tom Hardy

 

A true-crime film like no other, London Road recounts a series of murders that plagued the small British town of Ipswitch—entirely in song.  Every lyric in this one-of-a-kind cine-opera is taken verbatim from real-life interviews with the townsfolk, transforming a community in crisis into a spellbinding choir. The bold combination of documentary reportage with musical artifice conjures a delightful frisson, while retaining the core emotional truth of the harrowing episode that binds these neighbors.  Here is an exaltation of everyday language and community that you have to see—and hear—to believe.  “Enthralling and haunting… an exciting, unsettling experience blessed with imagination and compassion.  Five stars (Time Out).  “Utterly gripping and very moving… a unique triumph” (The Guardian).

Official Site: http://www.londonroadthefilm.com

Stills: https://app.box.com/s/ipjikks83d8wgknmp7yp867u56pwa9c2

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGhXnl-fXgQ

 

November 9, 2016 • 7 pm

After the Storm (Umi yori mada fukaku)(2016, Japan, 117 min., Digital)

Dir: Hirokazu Kore-eda

Cast: Hiroshi Abe, Yoko Maki, Taiyo Yoshizawa, Kirin Kiki

 

The new film from Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda (whose I Wish screened at Spotlight in 2012) is a characteristically warm and affecting portrait of an estranged family reconnecting during a typhoon.  Once a renowned author, Ryota has coasted on his glory a little too long, and now finds himself a divorced deadbeat dad, making ends meet as a private detective (and a lousy one at that).  The death of his father inspires Ryota to reconcile with his own family, if they’ll take him back.  Filmed in a housing complex where Kore-eda lived as a child, After the Storm is rendered with the intimacy of a cherished memory.  In Japanese with English subtitles.

Stills: http://www.filmmovement.com/theatrical/index.asp?MerchandiseID=526

 

November 16, 2016 • 7 pm

Don’t Call Me Son (Mae So Ha Uma)(2016, Brazil, 82 min., Digital)

Dir: Anna Muylaert

Cast: Naomi Nero, Daniel Botelho, Dani Nefussi, Matheus Nachtergaele, Lais Dias

 

A queer teenager’s life is upended when it is revealed that his working class mom stole him from a wealthy family at birth.  Thrust into a well-meaning but very conservative home, Pierre dons a zebra-print mini dress and pushes back.  As in her excellent 2015 film The Second Mother, writer/director Anna Muylaert punctures the entitlement and hypocrisy of the Brazilian bourgeoisie, while still retaining a central compassion for her individual characters.  Among Don’t Call Me Son’s greatest pleasures is Dani Nefussi’s bravura dual performance as both of Pierre’s mothers, each portrayal completely distinct and believable. Winner of the Teddy Award for best LGBT film at the 2016 Berlin Film Festival.  In Portuguese with English subtitles.

Stills: https://zeitgeistfilms.com/film/dontcallmeson

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHHvptOW774

 

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Housed in a soaring, Cesar Pelli-designed building, the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art provides free exhibitions and education programs that engage people in modern and contemporary art. The four galleries offer changing exhibitions that feature established and emerging artists. The Rooftop Sculpture Garden provides an urban oasis with an incredible view. The museum is open: Tuesday-Thursday: noon – 5pm; Friday: noon – 8pm; Saturday: 10am – 8pm; Sunday: noon – 5pm; and is closed on Mondays.     

 

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